Radiological diagnosis

Whether computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging: We offer you a wide range of radiological examination and diagnostic tools. On the following pages you will learn what the individual procedures offer and where they are used, how the examinations are carried out and how best to prepare yourself for them. …

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Examinations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

Thanks to the good representation of the brain and nerves, MRI has established itself as one of the most important diagnostic procedures for these areas of the body. Anatomical structures are accurately visualised. In this way, pathological changes, such as inflammations, scars, lesions, vascular dilatations (aneurysms) and narrowing (stenosis) as …

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Examinations using computed tomography (CT)

It is only since the introduction of computed tomography that it has been possible to look directly inside the skull without surgery. Bleeding, ischaemic strokes and lesions, as well as fractures of the skull can be easily recognized. The brain tissue and cerebral blood vessels can be assessed in a …

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Untersuchungen mittels Kernspintomographie (MRT)

What is an MRI of the spine? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine is particularly suitable for visualizing the non-bony soft-tissue structures in the entire spinal area. These are first and foremost the intervertebral discs between the individual vertebral bodies, the spinal cord and the nerve roots arising therefrom. …

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Examinations using computed tomography (CT)

When is computed tomography of the spine, joints or the skeletal system carried out? The focus of a CT scan of the musculoskeletal system is on the assessment of the shape and structure of the bone. MRI and sonography (ultrasound) are more suitable for imaging the soft tissue (muscles, tendons, …

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Examinations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

An MRI examination allows bones and joints to be mapped with millimetre precision. It is true that clear images of bony structures can be obtained with X-ray or CT examinations. However, computed tomography does not allow detailed statements to be made about the cartilage lining in the joints or the …

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Examinations using computed tomography (CT)

A computed tomography of bones and joints is generally carried out in order to assess the shape and structure of the bone. In cases where an image of the soft tissue is required (muscles, tendons, ligaments, articular cartilage), we are more likely to select MRI. Due to its calcium content …

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How good is your circulation?

Blood supplies our body with oxygen and nutrients, 24 hours a day, for a lifetime. Over the course of the years, deposits on or damage to the blood vessel walls may occur, with fatal consequences such as strokes, heart attacks, or major circulatory disorders. To ensure it does not come …

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Examinations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

Magnetic resonance angiography allows all of the body’s blood vessels to be represented without the use of x-rays. The only exceptions are the coronary blood vessels. The examination of veins is referred to as phlebography. Vascular imaging in the MRI is possible without contrast agents. Depending on the body region …

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Breast – Uterus

Statistically, every tenth woman in Germany develops breast cancer. With approximately 50,000 new cases diagnosed every year, this is by far the most frequent tumour disease among women, with the trend unfortunately still rising. Thanks to the greatly improved quality in screening, breast cancer mortality has been significantly reduced today. …

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